Purchasing Wooden Furniture And Artefacts

Despite our knowledge that wood is a finite resource that must be consumed with caution, there is an inherent draw towards wooden furniture, wooden artefacts, wooden home ware and more. Wood is extremely versatile and adapts to different situations and climes, with the result that wooden objects are in high demand. There are several things to look out for when offered wooden products and here are a few tips for purchasing such:

Fractures and Cracks

This is especially relevant for wooden furniture, but also for wooden kitchen ware, table ware and ornaments that carry weight. If properly made and aged, wood lasts several lifetimes in pristine condition. However, if improperly sanded, or polished or left too much in the hot sun, wooden objects may develop hairline cracks or fractures that damage the overall product. For instance, wooden furniture can develop hairline cracks as a result of overexposure to sun (think deck chairs) or due to years of wear and tear. If that rocker has existed since your great- grandmother’s time, it might be better to let a restorer check it over before you sit down and take a swing.

Termite Damage

This is rarer as it is more difficult to conceal termite damage from a prospective buyer, however on occasion, there may be pest damage on intricate wooden ornaments that are not immediately visible to the eye. Pre purchase pest inspections in Central Coast are recommended to eliminate any lingering doubts.

For instance, a carved wooden window lattice might look immaculate on viewing but may be riddled with worm holes or termite dust that will soon cause it to break apart. Or there may be cockroach eggs in under maintained furniture at shops that have escaped cursory glances that thorough pre purchase pest inspections will catch and eliminate. Look here for further information regarding termite inspections.

Know Your Worth

Wooden objects are expensive for good reasons. The raw material is difficult to source, it is increasingly scarce and professionals who work with wood are getting rarer. Most wooden furniture and wooden ornaments and jewellery are mass produced in factories. So when an object is unique or handmade, its prices soar. However, that is not a reason for you to be shelling out double or triple the market price. If you are serious about buying, know your worth. Decided on how much you can realistically afford to pay and then examine how much extra you are willing to pay if there is an object you really covet. Do your research before you hit the shops; ask around for the average price, read up on the opinion of professionals and walk in like a seasoned buyer – you will get a bargain.